Artigos

Assessing the Prevalence of Traumatic Head Injury amongst Recreational Surfers in the United States

Authors:
  • Swinnwey C.B.A. et al.
Study of low relevance
Full article

Surfing is a popular recreational sport that carries a substantial risk of injury. Although head injuries are frequently documented in the surfing population, an in depth assessment of the prevalence of surfing-related head injury has not been reported. A web-based survey was conducted in May of 2015. Participants were asked a series of questions regarding surfing-related injuries and demographic characteristics. A total of 50 responses were obtained, of which 35 (70%) reported sustaining a head injury. The most common injury was laceration of the head/face (n=27), followed by concussion (n=13). Other injuries, such as skull fracture and broken nose, were also reported. Only 2 of the 50 participants reported wearing a protective helmet. Neurosurgical intervention was required in 2 instances. Increased emphasis on preventative measures by the medical community may reduce the future incidence of such injuries. Medical professionals should be aware of the most common forms of injury sustained by the surfing population in order to better recognize and treat these conditions.

Objective: To evaluate the incidence of head injury / trauma (TBI) in (non-professional) surfers in the United States.

Methods: Web survey was conducted in May 2015. Participants received a series of questions about surf-related injuries and demographic characteristics.

Results: Fifty responses were obtained, of which 35 (70%) reported suffering some type of head injury. The most common lesion was head / face laceration (n = 27), followed by concussion (n = 13). Other injuries, such as skull fracture and broken nose, have also been reported. Only 2 of the 50 participants reported wearing a protective helmet. Neurosurgical intervention was required in 2 cases.

Conclusion: This study establishes the remarkable prevalence of surf-related head injuries as well as the lack of use of protective gear. Greater emphasis on preventive measures by the medical community may reduce the future incidence of such injuries. Medical professionals should be aware of the most common forms of injury suffered by the surf population in order to better recognize and treat these conditions. This fact is particularly relevant on the islands of Hawaii and the Pacific Rim, where surfing remains a popular activity among recreational and professional athletes.

SID opinion: 🤙🤙. Epidemiological study with low sample size, but shows how the head region is one of the most frequently injured sites when we talk about surfing trauma.

SID Tip: Helmet use, especially in shallow and crowded peaks, can provide important protection for head injuries.